Changes are coming for Opal card users

Do you use your Opal card to get around? While we love our cars it’s often easier to take public transport to busy places such as the Sydney CBD or indeed Macquarie Park.

Changes are afoot for Opal Card users starting Monday 5 September

  • Adult Opal customers will now receive a $2.00 discount when they change from one mode to another (e.g. Bus to Train), as long as they tap onto the second mode within 60 minutes of tapping off the first mode.
  • The current discount of 100% off all travel after the first eight paid journeys in a week will end. Now these trips will get a 50% discount.
  • On trips where the 50% discount applies, the $2.00 discount for changing modes will be reduced to $1.00.

These changes will benefit all Macquarie Park and North Ryde commuters who change between modes of transport during their commute. Currently travellers must pay the full fare for each mode of transport.

To find out more details – read the Fact Sheet

Here’s an example of how the new fare rules work

The current Opal pricing may disadvantage people who want to use different modes. For example, currently commuters choose between going faster and paying more. With the new Opal changes, you can take the faster option and pay less.

Case study – St Mary’s Station to Macquarie Uni Station

The fastest option is to get a train to Seven Hills Station and then get the 611 bus to Macquarie Uni. Previously this was $8.70 each way. The fare will now be $6.70 each way.

Driving greater transport integration

Minister for Transport and Infrastructure Andrew Constance said, “the Government is now making it cheaper to change between trains, buses, ferries and light rail. Ultimately, we want people on public transport and out of their cars.”

“It is a monumental shift towards making interchange cheaper on public transport, and making the entire system fairer,” Mr Constance said.

“We want greater integration on the transport network as we invest billions in the metro, light rail, new rapid bus lines and modern trains and ferries.”

The short URL of the present article is: http://www.rydebusiness.com.au/jmofr